600th Brigade


Accessed

The 600th Brigade (also the 177th Brigade and the 519th Brigade) known as the "Tracks of Fire Formation" ( Utzvah Nativi HaEsh) , was an IDF armored brigade. The formation was disbanded on 22 April 2014.[1]

The brigade was composed of three battalions - the 407th, the 409th and the 410th. During the Yom Kippur War command of the 407th BN was transferred to the 14th Brigade on the eve of Operation Stouthearted Men Abirei Lev (NB: The operation to cross the Suez Canal.) The other two battalions participated in a diversionary attack during the Suez Canal crossing and later took part in the towing of the Galilee Bridge (NB: Used to move armored vehicles and supplies across the canal.) Later, after the successful crossing, the brigade expanded its breakthrough in the area of the Chinese Farm in a difficult battle against the Egyptian Army. The remnants of the 407th BN crossed the Canal and continued to fight as part of the 14th Brigade until the cease-fire.

Table of Contents

1 History


1.1 Creation of the Brigade

The brigade was formed in 1971 as a reserve unit at Camp Chasa and later moved to Camp Sadeh Teiman

1.2 The Yom Kippur War

During the Yom Kippur War the brigade fought on the southern front under the command of Ravia Raviv as part of Arik Sharon's 143rd Division. The brigade was equipped with M60-A1 Patton tanks (magach), which made it the most modern and powerful force in the IDF. The unit was composed of 407th BN under the command of Oved Maoz, the 409th BN under the command of Uzi Ben Yitzhak, the 410th BN under the command of Amnon Marton and later a PALSA"R platoon and a company of infantry under the command of Yehuda Geller. During the battle of the Yom Kippur War, the brigade sustained 120 casualties[2]. Among the battles the brigade participated in were the battle near Hamadiyah Ridge (NB: the Egyptian 14 October attack on the Mitla and Gidi Passes against Sharon's Division), the battle

1.3

1.4

2 Brigade Commanders


3 Decorations and Citations


4 Further Reading


5 External Links


6 Footnotes